The Sixties Radical-Azriel- Blessings and Curses

The following thoughts are scattered and may seem disjointed and may not make much sense. Or have logical reason or continuity to them.

Pastor Steve’s sermon Sunday October 29th was one of those two by fours up the side of the head.

Here are some of my teacher Pastor Steve Gray’s words:” Yeshua bought us with HIS blood. G-d’s intention is for us to be blessed. There is still the law. We are not to live in lawlessness. You hear G-d speaking to you and do nothing this leads to a hard heart. Refuse to do what G-d asks of you not only you will have a hard heart. This does not stop with G-d. It effects all of your life.” (some paraphrase)

This is why I love my teachers Pastor Steve and Kathy Gay. They do not pull any punches. The words are loving, kind, severe, and full of generosity.

How can this be?

How can severe be in the mix? It is easy for Severity means the restriction of G-d’s word. It sets up the boundaries. It gives me guidelines. This is the guard rail that keeps me on the straight narrow righteous path.  (Think of Yitz’chak)

Kindness is Avraham.

Generosity is Ya’akov. And this generosity is passed down to Yeshua.

For Yeshua is all three kindness, severity and generosity.

I admit my wrongs. I asked for repentance. I turn back to G-d.  I then become a follower of Yeshua and then the real work begins.

For Yeshua knows I am guilty. I am guilty yet Yeshua pronounces over me I am innocent. The curse is broken, and I am set free.

This doesn’t mean I stop being a Jew. I don’t!

I still follow the Mitzvah’s G-d gave us at Mount Sinai.

G-d break the bondage of self. Drive out of me the evil inclination. Help me stop cursing myself.  Make me clean so I can live a life that will transform the world. Start with me and let me be a real follower of you Yeshua! A Jew is who is transformed into a dwelling place for G-d a living sacrifice on your Altar HaShem.

The Sixties Radical-Azriel Business Transformation

There is a beast inside. It awaits you for its tikun.

How do you fix up the human beast? First with prayer, then with food, but ultimately by doing business.

You need to start with meditation and prayer, because that beast inside needs to experience not only wonder, but even love for G‑d. The problem is, in prayer and meditation, you have not yet met that beast on its own ground.

Next, eat your breakfast like a human being is meant to eat—a step higher than the food you consume, raising it up rather than letting it pull you down. Then, yes, you have met your human beast on its own ground. But not on its own terms. You are still fighting with it—against its desire to be pulled down into the food.

So then go out into the world and provide goods and services of value, and do that with integrity.

No longer are you fighting against the human beast. You are working with it and from within it, with all the talents and skills you have. Because otherwise, you are not providing the value for which others are paying, and that is not integrity.

Now you can understand why the very first question asked of the soul when it returns from its mission in this world is not “How did you pray?” or “How did you eat” but “Did you do business with integrity?” For that is when you truly fixed up this world.

Padah B’Shalom, 573

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1702777/jewish/Business-Transformation.htm#utm_medium=email&utm_source=5_daily_dose_en&utm_campaign=en&utm_content=content

The Sixties Radical-Azriel Counteracting Negativity

Confession of sins is of utmost importance. “G‑d then reviewed the laws of theft, in order to encourage the Jewish people to make sure they were not in any way guilty of this sin before setting out on their journey toward the Land of Israel.

[G‑d instructed Moses to tell the Jewish people,] “When a man or woman sins, and feels guilty and confesses the sin he [or she] committed.” Numbers 5:6-7

If we have wronged a fellow human being in some way, we must first ask their forgiveness; then, we must restore the item or pay for any damage we caused. Then, we must “apologize” to G‑d, through repentance. Repentance consists of three steps:

regret for the past,

positive resolution for the future, and

verbal confession to G‑d of the misdeed.

Every misdeed creates negative energy, which has a “body” and a “soul.” The “body” of this energy is the misdeed itself, while its “soul” is the lust that caused the misdeed and accompanied it. Feeling regret for having committed a misdeed destroys the “soul” of the negative energy; confessing verbally – physically using our mouths – destroys the “body” of the negative energy.1” Derech Mitzvotecha, Vidui (pp. 38a ff).

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=05%2F30%2F2017

The Sixties Radical-Azriel The Power of Peace

Think about this. We reap what we sow. We sow good. We reap good. We sow blessing we reap blessing.

G-d wants only good for us.

After Moses counted the tribe of Levi as a whole, G‑d told him to count each of the three Levite clans separately, appointing each clan to carry specific components of the Tabernacle when the Jewish people would travel.

[G‑d told Moses,] “When [the members of the tribe of Levi’s son Kehat] approach the holiest of the holy things, Aaron and his sons must [first] come and appoint each man to his task.” Numbers 4:19

It often happens that when we strive to reach our potential in spiritual matters, we encounter forms of opposition. Sometimes other people ridicule us or are hostile to us; sometimes we are assaulted by inner voices of self-doubt. The Torah teaches us here that the proper response to these challenges is not to battle them but to use the power of Aaron, who dedicated his to being a peacemaker. Our loving-kindness will then either neutralize the negativity or eliminate it altogether. And transforming an adversary into an ally is the most complete and effective victory possible. 1. Hitva’aduyot 5748, vol. 3, pp. 405–407.

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=05%2F27%2F2017

The Sixties Radical-Azriel Traditions of the Future

We do not keep our traditions for the sake of the past. We keep it for their power to create a future, a power that will never end.

For the Torah was not given to this world so that it should return to its pristine glory as it was created. The Torah was given for this world to transcend itself.

Likutei Sichot 10, pg. 162. Masai 5741:18.

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/88212/jewish/Traditions-of-the-Future.htm#utm_medium=email&utm_source=5_daily_dose_en&utm_campaign=en&utm_content=content

The Sixties Radical-Azriel Spiritual Aspirations

Think about this concept and let it sink in.

“The Levites were singled out from among the rest of the Jewish people to act as G‑d’s personal servants. Nevertheless, the medieval Jewish sage Rabbi Moses Maimonides points out that anyone who wishes to dedicate himself to the service of G‑d can do so. He or she thereby becomes a “spiritual Levite” – and even a “spiritual priest,” or even a “spiritual high priest!” – regardless of his actual tribal lineage.1Hitva’aduyot 5745, vol. 4, pp. 2115–2116.

G‑d then instructed Moses to count the Levites. The Levites were exempt from military service because they were conscripted to serve in the Tabernacle. They guarded the Tabernacle, dismantled it whenever the Jewish people broke camp, reconstructed it whenever they camped, and assisted the priests in the Tabernacle rituals.

[G‑d told Moses,] “Bring forth the tribe of Levi and present them before Aaron the priest, that they may serve him.” Numbers 3:6

http://www.chabad.org/dailystudy/dailywisdom.asp?tdate=05%2F24%2F2017

The Sixties Radical-Azriel Delight Condensed

What is divine wisdom?
Divine wisdom is the inner delight of the Infinite, condensed and crystallized until fit for human consumption.

What is a mitzvah?
A mitzvah is divine wisdom condensed and crystallized until it can be performed as a physical action.

That is why in the study of Torah there is infinite delight.
That is why in the act of a mitzvah there is unlimited joy.

Maamar Arbaah Rashei Shanim Heim, 5731. Tanya, Igeret Hakodesh 29.

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1768189/jewish/Delight-Condensed.htm#utm_medium=email&utm_source=5_daily_dose_en&utm_campaign=en&utm_content=content